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August 20, 2011
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will you be my Anne Boleyn
will you offer up your head
eyes blind one fine morning
no more to love, no more to bed

will you offer up your head
it is the sacrifice I crave
no more to love, no more to bed
your bed, beloved, a marble grave

it is the sacrifice I crave;
just this bauble, bright and frail.
your bed, beloved, a marble grave;
wet-clay-cold and tallow-pale

just this bauble, bright and frail.
still upon this bed of straw
wet-clay-cold and tallow-pale
at the whim of a padishah

still upon this bed of straw
will you offer up your head
at the whim of a padishah
will you be my Anne Boleyn
Anne Boleyn Pantoum, a collaborative poem by
:iconalmcdermid::iconleyghan::iconprettycrazy::icondeinktvis:

Anne Boleyn (c.1501/1507 19 May 1536) was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of Henry VIII of England and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right. Henry's marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that was the start of the English Reformation.

Anne was crowned Queen of England on 1 June 1533. On 7 September she gave birth to the future Elizabeth I of England. To Henry's displeasure, however, she failed to produce a male heir. Henry was not totally discouraged, for he said that he loved Elizabeth and that a son would surely follow. Three miscarriages followed, however, and by March 1536, Henry was courting Jane Seymour.

Henry had Anne investigated for high treason in April 1536. On 2 May she was arrested and sent to the Tower of London, where she was tried before a jury of peers and found guilty on 15 May. She was beheaded four days later on Tower Green. Modern historians view the charges against her, which included adultery and incest, as unconvincing.

Following the coronation of her daughter, Elizabeth, as queen, Anne was venerated as a martyr and heroine of the English Reformation, particularly through the works of John Foxe.

Over the centuries, she has inspired or been mentioned in numerous artistic and cultural works. As a result, she has retained her hold on the popular imagination. Anne has been called "the most influential and important queen consort England has ever had," since she provided the occasion for Henry VIII to divorce Catherine of Aragon, and declare his independence from Rome.

Source: wikipedia [link]

That her daughter was one of the most historically influential British monarchs adds a nice touch of irony.
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:icontotiltwithwindmills:
totiltwithwindmills Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014   Writer
Oh, this is a beautiful poem! It's got such a nice rhythm and the words flow well.
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:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Thanks! Still want to write a second version.
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:icontotiltwithwindmills:
totiltwithwindmills Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2014   Writer
You should do it! I think that could be neat. I always find it fun sometimes to write a new version of old work. It's a nice way to compare your improvements.
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:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Aug 30, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Yes, since I really have nothing else to write. :XD:

I'll probably do it the next time I get the poetry bug. I've been working on a collection of flash fiction and poetry. I'll probably include it there. 
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:iconmerpagigglesnort:
merpagigglesnort Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2011   Traditional Artist
also, though the image is very well known and obviously in the public domain, it would be better form to credit some sources (i know the artist that painted the portrait is unknown) or acknowledge the painting somehow since this is an art setting and that's a painting and that's what appears as the thumb for the poem.

it is not clear here who painted the painting--where you got it from and as i've said the description as well. i know it's incredibly easy to find an image like this, but you might be surprised how much research has been done in regards to that painting. many scholars believe it is one of many paintings said to be anne boleyn, that are actually portraits done long after her death by people who'd never seen her. there are many questions as to whether any extant portraits are actually based actually upon how she looks. there is much question as to what she actually looked like.

sorry to go on and on, but artists treat art as sacred in regards to theft and reproduction without credit, but the same is not done for history in this community...
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:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
As a well-known image of Anne, that is in the public domain. And, as with the comment, it is there for the reader; it is not part of the art. As to whether it is actually her image . . . I just see why I would need to deal with that issue in this context.

I can't see how this could be construed as theft; it's clear fair-use reference. If the artist was known, if it were by Holbein, for example, perhaps (and even then, it's for citation purposes). In this case, sorry, I don't see it.
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:iconmerpagigglesnort:
merpagigglesnort Featured By Owner Dec 18, 2011   Traditional Artist
love the subject matter, great poem,
however, i have slight issue with the description beneath the poem. it appears to be an essay written by one of the collaborators with link to widipedia that is not obvious. i think it would be much more appropriate to state at the beginning that this description was taken almost verbatim from wiki. if it weren't the internet i would expect footnotes and quotation marks, etc.
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:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Feb 5, 2012  Hobbyist Writer
Thanks.

Well, the comment is not the art and I don't have written it. If someone wants to make that assumption, I can't really stop that. And since I do reference wikipedia as the source, I don't see a problem.

But we are on the internet, and this explanation is there for people who may not know who she is. It is the footnote.
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:iconrawpoetry:
RawPoetry Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2011   Photographer
A group that works very well together, this is a lovely piece. :)
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:iconalmcdermid:
almcdermid Featured By Owner Aug 20, 2011  Hobbyist Writer
Had something else in mind when I started it, but I prefer this; we do seem to work well together (I've worked with all of the poets before on other pieces).
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